Earth’s Oldest Trees in Climate-Induced Race up the Tree Line — Bristlecone pine trees in the Great Basin are losing the game of leapfrog with the limber pine

Summary: Tree-line species are shifting in the Great Basin of the U.S. Limber pine trees are ‘leapfrogging,’ slowly, over ancient bristlecone pines upslope. If limber pine trees block bristlecones from advancing upslope, bristlecones could face local extirpations. *     *     *     *     * Bristlecone pine and limber pine trees in the Great Basin region are like…

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How Much Drought Can a Forest Take? Aerial Tree Mortality Surveys Show Patterns of Tree Death During Extreme Drought

Quick Summary Trees in the driest, densest forests are most vulnerable to dying in extreme drought Effects of extreme drought on forests can take years to surface High tree mortality rates likely to continue as drought effects linger Why do some trees die in a drought and others don’t? And how can we predict where…

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High-Severity Wildfires Complicate Natural Regeneration for California Conifers: New Tool Helps Foresters Prioritize Restoration Efforts

Quick summary Only about half of conifer trees regenerated five to seven years after wildfire in sites studied. Study spanned 10 national forests and 4 burned areas in California. Study presents tool to help foresters prioritize which lands to plant after a wildfire. A study spanning 10 national forests and 14 burned areas in California…

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After California Wildfires, Southern Plant Species Are on the Rise

University of California, Davis August 10, 2015 As California wildfires burn tree canopies and forest floors, the plants that are recolonizing the burned understory are increasingly those found in more southern areas of the West, according to a study from the University of California, Davis. “The plants we’re finding underneath our forests are becoming more…

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