Paul Gepts receives Chancellor’s Award for International Engagement at UC Davis

Plant Sciences distinguished professor Paul Gepts was one of three recipients of the 2018 Chancellor’s Award for International Engagement at UC Davis. At a reception on March 2, Gepts received the award from UC Davis Chancellor Gary May. Honoring Gepts at the ceremony were: Joanna Regulska (Vice provost and associate chancellor, Global Affairs) Helene Dillard…

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Native Wildflowers Bank on Seeds Underground to Endure Drought

Exotic Grasses Depleted Seed Bank Accounts During Drought While Natives Were Saved Quick Summary Native wildflowers saved a lot of seeds during California’s drought — 201 percent more than usual Exotic grasses decreased their seed bank by 52 percent during the drought Drought-tolerant wildflowers enjoyed the greatest increases Effects of a prolonged drought remain unknown,…

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U.S. and German Plant Scientists Explore International Partnership

Daniel Potter and Astrid Volder, professors in the Dept. of Plant Sciences, are working with international colleagues to explore an international partnership in plant sciences. CEPLAS – Cluster of Excellence on Plant Sciences – a consortium of plant sciences researchers from several German institutions, recently initiated discussions with plant sciences programs at several U.S. universities…

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UC Davis Plant Breeding Academy – Class VII Starts in September 2018 (Register now; discount before March 31, 2018)

The UC Davis Plant Breeding Academy (PBA) is a professional certificate program, offered since 2006, with classes in the United States, Europe, Africa and Asia. To date, the course has trained more than 380 breeders. More than 70 percent of participants are from the private seed industry. Class VII of the PBA in Davis, California,…

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Tracking Down Transposable Elements in Maize: New Map Will Aid Research and Breeding Efforts

Overview: A new map of transposons in maize will help identify the role of transposable elements, and help with the breeding of maize, a major global crop. Transposable elements (also called transposons or “jumping genes”) have been an elusive DNA component for decades, primarily because they’ve been so difficult to sequence and assemble, until now….

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