Regulatory Barriers to the Development of Innovative Agricultural Biotechnology by Small Businesses and Universities

New CAST issue paper, co-authored by Professor Kent Bradford at UC Davis, examines the current U.S. regulatory system for GE crops, compares it with those of major trading partners, and considers the effects it has on agricultural biotechnology. The authors of this paper demonstrate that the current process-based U.S. biotechnology regulatory system is a barrier…

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I’m a fourth-generation California farmer: My research is one reason to support the University of California

I might be just the kind of person the state’s founders envisioned when on March 23, 1868 – 150 years ago Friday – they chartered the University of California. A fourth-generation California rice grower, I was able to go to a world-class university and pursue an advanced degree, thanks to California’s system of public higher…

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Food and Agriculture: A Global Conversation

The Food and Agriculture: A Global Conversation symposium will take place on April 24, 2018, at UC Davis. The conference will bring together leaders in academia, industry, and the media to provide participants with scientific information about agriculture, nutrition, and food security. It will spark collaborations between attendees that will enhance the public discourse of scientific issues. The symposium…

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Invitation for Landscape Horticulture Academics and Professionals: The 2018 UC Landscape Plant Irrigation Trials

UC Landscape Plant Irrigation Trials evaluate plant material to identify low water-use plants for California. UC’s Landscape Plant Irrigation Trials invites members of the professional landscape, nursery, and horticultural industries to the Spring 2018 Open House Ratings Day. All new landscape plants undergo evaluation in plant trials before being introduced to the market. At the…

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Understanding How Rice Root Microbiome Can Promote Agricultural Growth

Your body plays host to a microbial ecosystem that’s ever-evolving, and its composition has implications for your overall health. The same holds true for plants and their microbiomes and the relationship is of pivotal importance to agriculture. In a paper appearing in PLOS Biology, Joseph Edwards, ’17 Ph.D. in Plant Biology, Professor Venkatesan Sundaresan, departments…

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Paul Gepts receives Chancellor’s Award for International Engagement at UC Davis

Plant Sciences distinguished professor Paul Gepts was one of three recipients of the 2018 Chancellor’s Award for International Engagement at UC Davis. At a reception on March 2, Gepts received the award from UC Davis Chancellor Gary May. Honoring Gepts at the ceremony were: Joanna Regulska (Vice provost and associate chancellor, Global Affairs) Helene Dillard…

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Native Wildflowers Bank on Seeds Underground to Endure Drought

Exotic Grasses Depleted Seed Bank Accounts During Drought While Natives Were Saved Quick Summary Native wildflowers saved a lot of seeds during California’s drought — 201 percent more than usual Exotic grasses decreased their seed bank by 52 percent during the drought Drought-tolerant wildflowers enjoyed the greatest increases Effects of a prolonged drought remain unknown,…

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U.S. and German Plant Scientists Explore International Partnership

Daniel Potter and Astrid Volder, professors in the Dept. of Plant Sciences, are working with international colleagues to explore an international partnership in plant sciences. CEPLAS – Cluster of Excellence on Plant Sciences – a consortium of plant sciences researchers from several German institutions, recently initiated discussions with plant sciences programs at several U.S. universities…

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Decoding the Redwoods: As Threats to California’s Giant Redwoods Grow, Their Salvation Might Be in Their Complex Genetic Code

[Summary from the Washington Post]: As California’s climate changes to one of extremes, the only coast redwoods on the planet are in peril. Just 5 percent of the redwoods that stood before 1849 are still alive. Scientists are mapping the coast redwood’s genome, a genetic code 12 times larger than that of a human being….

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