Food and Agriculture: A Global Conversation

The Food and Agriculture: A Global Conversation symposium will take place on April 24, 2018, at UC Davis. The conference will bring together leaders in academia, industry, and the media to provide participants with scientific information about agriculture, nutrition, and food security. It will spark collaborations between attendees that will enhance the public discourse of scientific issues. The symposium…

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Understanding How Rice Root Microbiome Can Promote Agricultural Growth

Your body plays host to a microbial ecosystem that’s ever-evolving, and its composition has implications for your overall health. The same holds true for plants and their microbiomes and the relationship is of pivotal importance to agriculture. In a paper appearing in PLOS Biology, Joseph Edwards, ’17 Ph.D. in Plant Biology, Professor Venkatesan Sundaresan, departments…

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New Insight Into Unique Plant Chemical Could Inform Future Drug Development

Researchers, including Daniel Kliebenstein in the Department of Plant Sciences at UC Davis, and researchers at the University of Copenhagen, have unearthed new insight into a plant compound that could be used to help develop improved herbicides and treatments for human disease. Their study, published in the journal eLife, addresses the question of how natural…

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Combining Vegetables and Livestock in Cambodian Farming

New research supported by the Horticulture Innovation Lab at UC Davis aims to help farmers in Cambodia better integrate growing vegetables, raising livestock and maintaining healthy soil — all in the same place. “By understanding the interactions between horticulture and livestock systems, we can help farmers make better use of agricultural inputs such as fertilizer…

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Inventing a Low-Cost Solution to Reduce Moldy Foods: ‘DryCard’ Takes the Guesswork Out of Drying

How do you see dryness? Solar drying is a simple way for smallholder farmers to preserve their harvest, but knowing when food is dry enough to store is complex. UC Davis researchers invented a low-cost, easy-to-use tool that farmers can use to measure food dryness, called the DryCardTM. In developing countries, mold growth on dried…

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