Horticulture Innovation Lab Students Take Top Honors in ‘Agrilinks Young Scholar Blog Contest’

This fall the Agrilinks website held a young scholar blog contest to draw attention to the digital, first-hand stories of the next generation of global food security researchers. Plucked out of a sea of provoking narratives, blog posts penned by three students from the Horticulture Innovation Lab’s network were honored in the competition: Lauren Howe, a UC Davis student pursuing a master’s degree in…

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Eduardo Blumwald and Jorge Dubcovsky among 19 from UC Davis in the Global List of Most-Cited Researchers

Nineteen researchers from the University of California, Davis, have been named in the annual Highly Cited Researchers 2018 list released by Clarivate Analytics. The list identifies exceptional scientists and social scientists who have demonstrated significant influence by publishing multiple papers that rank in the top 1 percent by citations in a particular field and year,…

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Development of an Automated Delivery System for Therapeutic Materials to Treat HLB-infected Citrus (Citrus Greening Disease)

Louise Ferguson, a Cooperative Extension Specialist in the Department of Plant Sciences at UC Davis and with UC Cooperative Extension, is a Co-PI in a $3.4 million USDA NIFA-funded project, “Development of an automated delivery system for therapeutic materials to treat HLB-infected citrus.” The four-year project is based at University of Florida, UC Davis/UC Cooperative…

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Back-to-the-Future Plants Give Climate Change Insights: Outdoor labs give realistic sense of plant response to future climate change

Summary Experiments exposing today’s seeds with future CO2 conditions can fairly accurately portray future plant response Plant growth is stimulated as CO2 increases, but drought and high temperatures can limit that growth Higher-carb crops expected under future climate change If you were to take a seed and zap it into the future to see how…

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Change on the Range: Is a New Generation of Young, Female Ranchers Ready to Adapt to Climate Change?

A new breed of ranchers is bringing diverse demographics and unique needs to rangeland management in California. These first-generation ranchers are often young, female and less likely to, in fact, own a ranch. But like more traditional rangeland managers, this new generation holds a deep love for the lifestyle and landscapes that provide a wealth…

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Downy Mildew Research to Benefit Lettuce Growers and Consumers: Funds Will Support Genomics Research for $3 Billion Crop

Quick Summary Downy mildew is the most economically important pathogen infecting lettuce Research to benefit conventional and organic farmers and reduce crop loss Research will provide consumers food grown using fewer chemicals Researchers at the University of California, Davis, will use the genomics of lettuce to combat a pathogen that causes losses in the $3…

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